Nurse job definition

Nursing is an occupational profession that is required to meet the occupational qualification standards set by the Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OHSSA).

The nursing profession includes physicians, nurses, registered nurses, allied health professionals, pharmacists, physiotherapists, nurses-to-be, nursing assistants, and occupational health and safety specialists.

To qualify as a nurse, you must: be at least 25 years old, have a high school diploma or GED, and pass the licensure exam.

You must also meet the qualifications of a nurse-practitioner.

The occupation of a licensed nurse is determined by state law.

The nursing industry has many requirements for its workforce, including: 1.

You have to be at the home, at your work, or in a nursing home.

The home is the place where the nursing staff live, work, and meet the requirements of the nursing profession.

2.

You may not work from home or travel to work.

3.

You are required to have a current physical examination.

4.

You will be responsible for supervising the nursing home staff and providing care for their needs.

5.

You can’t have children or children-in-law.

6.

You cannot practice in a non-family setting.

7.

You need a valid license to practice nursing.

8.

You also must be able to perform physical and occupational duties in a safe and competent environment.

9.

You work for a licensed physician.

10.

You practice nursing for less than one year and your primary care provider must also be licensed.

11.

You should not work in a home environment that can be hazardous to your health or safety.

12.

You won’t be allowed to practice in places where you would pose a risk to yourself or others, or where there are unsafe working conditions.

13.

You aren’t allowed to have children in a family or care home.

14.

You’re not allowed to work from a home without a licensed professional.

15.

You don’t have to wear a uniform.

16.

You haven’t been diagnosed with cancer.

17.

You meet other medical standards.

18.

You take a minimum of 15 hours of physical and/or occupational therapy per week.

19.

You wear a nurse uniform.

20.

You receive training to prepare for and perform a registered nurse’s duties.

21.

You pass a background check.

22.

You apply for licensure through the Occupation Licensing Board.

23.

You earn your nursing license through the licensing process.

24.

You get paid by the state for your time.

25.

You qualify for benefits for the nursing job.

26.

You file a federal employment discrimination complaint with the EEOC.

27.

You submit a written letter of intent.

28.

You write to the Occupment Licensing Division of the state licensing board.

29.

The state licensing commissioner issues you a license.

30.

The board issues you an occupational license.

31.

You perform nursing services for a registered nursing home and for a nursing facility.

32.

You hold a nurse license and you are licensed as a registered and licensed nursing home nurse.

33.

You become licensed to practice medicine, nursing, dentistry, or a related occupation in a licensed nursing facility as an occupational nurse.

34.

You obtain a credential from the United States Department of Health and Human Services as an RN. 35.

You conduct the services of a registered registered nurse.

36.

You complete a three-year residency in a registered community nursing facility, licensed community nursing home, or licensed community home.

37.

You seek licensure to practice as a certified nursing home administrator.

38.

You register as a licensed clinical social worker.

39.

You attend an accredited training program and complete a licensing examination.

40.

You achieve the level of licensure required by the Nursing Education and Training Standards Board of Governors for a Registered Nurse.

41.

You join the RN profession.

42.

You participate in a training program that meets the Occupations Training Standards for Registered Nurses.

43.

You graduate from an accredited nursing program or from a school of nursing, certified nursing school, or registered nursing school.

44.

You choose to become licensed as an allied health professional.

45.

You serve in a hospital or other health care facility.

46.

You do a full range of patient care.

47.

You use the services provided by the health care professional as a primary care professional.

48.

You deliver home-based services.

49.

You provide nursing services at the hospital.

50.

You handle home care services.

51.

You administer and coordinate care to nursing home residents.

52.

You manage nursing home staffing and provide oversight.

53.

You oversee nursing home care facilities.

54.

You supervise registered nurses.

55.

You assist with the care of children and caretakers.

56.

You support and assist with health care planning.

57.

You operate and manage a nursing facilities.

58.

You monitor nursing home conditions and ensure compliance with state nursing home safety standards.

59.

You report to